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February 2011

Archive - February 2011

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Features


History, Under Glass, by Erin Parkhurst

The Menokin Foundation and some architects have hatched a bold plan to restore the 18th-century home of Francis Lightfoot Lee using structural glass--something that has never been done before.


The Big Story, by Chiles T. A. Larson

In 1903 the Virginia-Pilot newspaper got one of the biggest scoops ever, thanks to the efforts of a 19-year-old cub reporter and a barrel of Lynnhaven oysters.


Hunt Counrty Hounds, by Guy Schum

To hunt fox, you need swift horses, intrepid riders ... and hard-working hounds. A visit with the intensely dedicated American foxhounds of the Middleburg Hunt Club.

In Every Issue


Letters | Contributors | Natives | Reviews | Style | Bellwether | About TownOdd Dominion | Departures

Upfront


Stage Presence, by Richard Ernsberger Jr.

Todd Ristau--actor, director, playwright and teacher--is a catalyst for good theatre in Roanoke.


Seeing Red, by Caroline Kettlewell

The northern cardinal looks like a superhero but doesn't venture far.


Daylight Fantastic, by Bland Crowder

'Fast' time had a rocky start in hanover, and across the country.


Equine Evolution, by Bill Glose

A fond, and very detailed, look at the 400-year history of the horse in this state.


Primitive Landscapes, by Sarah Sargent

For painter John Borden Evans, the act of painting is not just a means to an end, but the end itself.

Departments


Humor | A Slippery Slope, by Clarke C. Jones

A roommate ski trip goes downhill in a hurry.


Virginiana | 'This Is Master X', by Dougald Blue

Jesse Lee Boland was a burly, alluring con man who, in the 1930s and 1940s, sold spiritual advice to thousands of people. His act was absurd--a reporter once described him as "Orson Welles made up to look like Othello"--but popular. A retrospective on a conjurer who would mess up your mind.


Food | Veggie Wish List, by Christina Ball

In the Shenandoah Valley, near Staunton, Harvest Thyme Herbs produces a variety of herbs and vegetables (parsnips, radishes, sunchokes and more) that are making their way to Zynodoa, Staunton Grocery and other restaurants where the farm-to-table concept is taken seriously. 


Home | New World Cotswold, by Daisy Ridgway Khalifa

Architecturally, Great Falls is about as far from the quintessential English countryside and its old limestone homes as you can get. Or is it? Alderly estate, and impressively modernized version of an English farmhouse, is surprisingly cozy and unostentatious. As one of the owners says, "It is large, but when you walk in, it doesn't feel that way."

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